20 Best Things to Do in Turks and Caicos

Turks and Caicos
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Located near the south of the famous Bahamas, Turks and Caicos sit beautifully with gorgeous coral reefs, golden beaches, and turquoise waters.

There are almost 40 islands, but not all of them are inhabited.

The locations deserve your time to explore their endless bays, crevasses, caverns, wildlife, marine life, and other beautiful attractions.

They fall under the British Overseas Territory and are among the most luxurious island destinations in the world.

Here are the best things to do in Turks and Caicos:

Visit Grand Turk Lighthouse

Grand Turk Lighthouse with green plants in the forefront
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True to its name, Grand Turk Lighthouse is indeed a grand one.

You can find this attraction in the northern part of the island.

It has stood on the tip for several hundred years and is now known as the landmark of Turks and Caicos.

Majectic white Grand Turk Lighthouse
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The lighthouse is also historically significant, for it was not manufactured here.

The pieces used to build the lighthouse were brought by a massive ship from Britain.

February and March are best known as the whale seasons here.

You can usually see one or two swimming near the shore.

Spot JoJo the Dolphin at Grace Bay

Outdoor pool chairs at Grace Bay Beach
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One of the most beautiful Caribbean beaches, the vast Grace Bay extends for almost 8 kilometers.

Its sand almost looks like golden powder shimmering in the sun, and when the sunlight falls on the perfectly blue water, it glistens.

Tropical scene at Grace Bay
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Grace Bay is also the home of JoJo the Dolphin, who was declared a National Treasure.

JoJo is a wild Atlantic Bottlenose who's known to interact with humans.

If you are lucky, you might get to meet this cute bottlenose mammal.

Aerial shot of Grace Bay with its beautiful blue water and wooden pier
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Take Snaps at Chalk Sound National Park

Chalk Sound National Park is bound to be one of the most alluring lagoons you'll ever see.

When you look at it from a distance, you will not fail to see the gorgeous shades of turquoise.

You can find a lot of iguanas moving around here, and the water sparkles right in front of your eyes.

Explore the area and go kayaking amid the green rocks and blue waters.

Explore the Crevasse at Bight Reef

While you are hanging around Grace Bay, a secret path will lead you to the lovely Bight Reef.

This region is filled with different exotic fish species and coral reefs.

It's an excellent spot for snorkeling, and many of those who visit Bight Reef come to do just that.

There are a lot of mini caves where vibrant fishes stay.

Do explore those if you want to see more of the aquatic inhabitants.

Both amateurs and pros can go on an adventure here.

Spend a Relaxing Day at Sapodilla Bay

Scenic view of Sapodilla Bay
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How about a break from the beach crowds?

Sapodilla Bay is a secluded spot where you can lay down under the sun, get a tan, and relax.

Drone shot of the turquoise blue water at Sapodilla Bay
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The water is shallow, so it is great for non-swimmers and children.

From the bay, you can access Sapodilla Hill, which is said to have paths that lead to hidden treasures.

Vibrant sunset at Sapodilla Bay
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You'll find rock carvings that were engraved by shipwrecked sailors.

The old carvings date as far back as the 1700s.

Go Snorkeling at Governor’s Beach

A boat docked at Governor's Beach
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Turks and Caicos has no shortage of snorkeling scenes.

If you are a beginner, Governor’s Beach is a great place to try out snorkeling for the first time.

Governor’s Beach with blue wide ocean and fluffy clouds in the background
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The beach is large, and there are usually many people, so anyone can come to your aid if you need it.

Governor's Beach is located near the seaport, too.

Governor’s Beach in Turks and Caicos
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Spot Iguanas at Little Water Cay

Iguana at Little Water Cay
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Little Water Cay is one of the best places to visit in Turks and Caicos if you want to see native wildlife.

It is located a bit away from Providenciales and is nicknamed the Island of Iguanas.

Close up of an Iguana at Little Water Cay
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There was a time that you'd get to see these little creatures all over the islands; but as more people and their pets came to live there, the iguanas were eventually driven away.

Little Water Cay is a piece of protected land for the iguanas.

If you want to go to this island, you can get there by kayaking!

Calm blue water at Little Water Cay
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Swim with the Stingrays at Gibbs Cay

Stingray at Gibbs Cay
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Gibbs Cay is another one of the very exotic Turks and Caicos locations where you get to meet a lot of marine life.

Are you interested in stingrays?

Or, are you terribly scared of them?

If you are one of the former, you'll enjoy Gibbs Cay to the fullest.

Meanwhile, if you're one of the latter, you will realize that there is nothing to fear about these little creatures.

Underwater view of Gibbs Cay
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The stingrays in this location are known to be extremely friendly and calm.

Some of them might even swim up to you.

Located a bit away from Grand Turk, Gibbs Cay is quite a popular spot, and you can easily ride a boat to get there.

There are also snorkeling options on the island, and the coral reefs of this part are truly gorgeous.

You can also have a picnic here if you'd like.

Interact with the Sea Life at Smith’s Reef

A boat sailing through the blue water at Smith’s Reef
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Located in Coral Gardens, Smith’s Reef is one of the best locations to get in touch with some of the most incredible coral reefs in Turks and Caicos.

The place is gorgeous and filled with colorful fishes.

Sign board at Smith’s Reef
RoadTripWarrior, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

You can even interact with them, as they are not scared of humans and will probably peep at you.

The coral reef is vast, drawing the attention of many tourists.

Go Hiking along the Crossing Place Trail

Did you think Turks and Caicos was all about swimming?

In addition to that, it's a haven for adventurers looking for some action.

If you'd enjoy a break from swimming, head over to the Crossing Place Trail, a Natural Trust Heritage site.

The hiking trails are gorgeous and might be challenging at times, but you will easily make your way along if you are a pro.

You'll go past a lot of caves, coves, and beaches.

Have a Beach Day at Pine Cay

Scenic view of Pine Cay
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Have you ever wanted to explore a private island?

Pine Cay is located close to Providenciales, and its main attraction is its gorgeous white beach that goes undisturbed for almost 4 kilometers.

Some say that it is even more beautiful than the great Grace Bay.

Pine Cay in Turks and Caicos
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There is another spot located quite close to this Pine Cay called Fort George Cay.

It is said that the island is exceptionally picturesque and is home to ruins from a British Fort, making it even more interesting.

Pine trees in Pine Cay
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Enjoy the Breathtaking Mudjin Harbour

Breath taking view of Mudjin Harbour
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Mudjin Harbour is among the islands' top five tourist attractions mainly because the space is massive and you can enjoy the beach and waves fully.

There are snorkeling opportunities here as well.

You can find a lot of limestone cliffs hanging around.

Nature trail in Mudjin Harbour
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Do remember to take a lot of pictures, as this is one of the most popular locations.

You even have access to Dragon Island, which is located a bit away from Mudjin Harbour.

Waves crashing on the shores of Mudjin Harbour
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Discover the Conch Bar Caves

Interior of the Conch Bar Caves
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You might have heard about how many underground cave systems there are in the Caribbean islands.

It's said that the Conch Bar Caves are the biggest of them all.

The caverns extend around for 24 kilometers, and they are quite breathtaking.

Limestone formations in Conch Bar Caves
Karen Wunderman / Shutterstock.com

They even have lagoons attached to them.

These were considered religious, and the native Lucayan Indians used these as ceremonial grounds.

Even today, you can find many petroglyphs engraved on the walls.

Go Scuba Diving in the Columbus Passage

Turks and Caicos offers the best experience for those who enjoy water sports.

One of the most popular activities tourists enjoy in the blue waters of the islands of Turks and Caicos happens to be scuba diving.

Grand Turk is one of the most premium locations for diving here, but there are plenty of others too.

Tourists are highly encouraged to try diving in the mesmerizing Columbus Passage, which is filled with sea creatures.

Imagine diving beside the beautiful dolphins!

Of course, there are many other water-related activities you can enjoy here.

Whether it's snorkeling, swimming, diving, or just sunbathing, Turks and Caicos has some of the best options for you.

Visit the Underrated Gem That Is Salt Cay

Beautiful view of Salt Cay
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This beautiful location happens to be a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Many tourists tend to skip out on this particular attraction, but the ones who check this out are the true winners.

You might not have read about it, but there was a time when the economy of Turks and Caicos heavily depended on the salt industry.

Colorful restaurant in Salt Cay
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Salt Cay was the location that came up with the maximum quantity of salt.

The island gives off an exclusive vibe nowadays, as very few people choose to continue living here.

Rocks resting on the shores of Salt Cay
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You'll spot lots of wild cattle and iguanas roaming around.

Do check out the Balfour Town while you are here, for it is one of the quaint little towns within the Salt Cay with some pieces of history still attached to it.

Enjoy Pony Rides at the Beach with Provo Ponies

Long Bay Beach horseback riding tours go anywhere from 60 to 90 minutes with Provo Ponies.

Provo Ponies is the place to go for unique family activities.

Whether you're a seasoned horseback rider or a novice, these trips allow you to see Turks and Caicos' beaches in a new light.

You may even partly immerse your horse in the water during this family-friendly adventure.

Adults, teenagers, and children aged six and up are welcome on these equestrian trips.

Explore the Past at the Turks and Caicos National Museum

Exterior view of Turks and Caicos National Museum
Balou46, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

There's a lot to see and learn about the islands' history at the Turks and Caicos National Museum, which opened in 1991.

What do you do with the kids when it's raining in Turks & Caicos?

Include this museum in your Turks and Caicos itinerary.

Even if it lacks some of the most cutting-edge displays, the museum is nonetheless a worthwhile educational experience for children.

Slave narratives and natural history exhibits coexist together in this museum's collection.

It also features other intriguing relics, such as the earliest known shipwreck in the New World.

The Turks and Caicos National Museum provides an educational experience for children ages six and up.

See the Ruins at Cheshire Hall

Sign board at Cheshire Hall
Dwkaminski, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

If you want to see the best-preserved plantation-era ruins in Providenciales, this is the place to go.

Cheshire Hall is Turks and Caicos' most significant cultural heritage monument.

This 1700s plantation, spanning 5,000 acres, was established by Thomas Stubbs.

Ruins of Cheshire Hall
Dwkaminski, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The plantation employed a multitude of slaves to build the limestone structures.

In addition to the rich history, the site's biodiverse ecology allows visitors to experience its charm in its natural state.

Hike the Bird Rock Point Heritage Field Road

Find peace and quiet at the Bird Rock Point Heritage Field Road, a coastal coppice forest preserve.

The 111-acre coppice is surrounded by a residential area, with a farm of conchs nearby.

The east end of Providenciales still has some undeveloped places that tourists may explore on a short, one-and-a-half-mile trek leading to a magnificent spot across Bird Rock.

Explore the mangroves, sandy coves, the seagrass beds only several feet from the coast while you're here.

If you're a fan of the outdoors, hiking this road is a must-try activity.

Immerse Yourself in Nature at the National Environment Center

This exciting and instructive museum is located across the street from Children's Park Bight Beach.

It contains exhibits related to the islands' natural and cultural history.

The facility's centerpiece is a replica of the unique undersea plateau serving as the foundation of the nation's islands.

Despite its modest size, the National Environment Center offers exciting and educational tours by kind and well-informed volunteers.

In addition, it's a convenient pit break if you have time to spare on your way to Bight or Smith's Reefs, which are also nearby.

Final Thoughts

The Turks and Caicos Islands provide the ideal location for a relaxing and unforgettable family vacation.

With their glistening blue seas, laid-back atmosphere, and white sand beaches, these islands are the perfect getaway from your hectic lifestyle.

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