15 Best Things to Do in Waxahachie, TX

Scarborough Renaissance Festival, Waxahachie, TX
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The historic city of Waxahachie, Texas, took its name from two sources: the Waxah Indian tribe's term for a stream, and the Coosaw tribe's word Hatchie, which means creek in both languages.

It began as an agricultural community on the Waxahachie Creek bank around 1850.

In 1988, the Waxahachie area was the site of the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator, the Superconducting Super Collider, with a projected ring radius of 54.1 miles (87.1 km).

Before Congress canceled the project in 1993, the project had dug 17 holes and bored 14.6 miles of tunnel.

Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston can all be reached in a few hours by car from Waxahachie, making this "gingerbread city" a popular tourist destination.

Because of its proximity to these places, it offers a lot to tourists.

There are so many things to do in Waxahachie that planning your trip to The Gingerbread City may be difficult.

Do not be alarmed, brave Texas tourist.

If you keep reading, you'll learn about some of the most extraordinary things to do while you're here.

Bask in the Glory of Ellis County Courthouse

Outside View of Ellis County Courthouse
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This historic courthouse is considered one of the most notable architectural achievements in Texas.

It is one of 86 historic courthouses around the state placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It is one of the state's most notable architectural achievements.

The courthouse, completed in 1897 to replace several structures, including an initial log cabin built in 1850, is the fourth in a series of courthouses to exist on this location in Waxahachie.

Closer View of Ellis County Courthouse
SarahCate Philipson, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The converted vault, corrugated ceilings, cast-iron Corinthian columns, and fantastic iron grillwork are just a few of the architectural highlights of this Richardsonian Romanesque-style structure.

The Visitors Center, County Auditor's Offices, and a renovated District Courtroom are all located within the courthouse's walls.

In the courtyard, a magnificent clock tower displays E. Howard & Co.'s four-faced clock, while a state sculpture by Attilio Piccirilli, a Smithsonian-registered sculptor, honors significant state figure Richard Ellis is on display.

Catch Fish at Lake Waxahachie

In the heart of the Lone Star State, Lake Waxahachie boasts a beautiful tree-lined shoreline and a 656-acre body of water with crystal-clear visibility.

The landscape around Lake Waxahachie is spectacular, but the lake is most renowned for its excellent fishing.

Those crystal-clear waters are home to white bass, largemouth bass, channel catfish, blue catfish, and crappie.

You may find access sites on the lake's north side; therefore, go to one of them.

There are only a handful of parking places at each of the three locations, so arrive early. The lake is a great place to go, even if you're not a big fisherman.

Enjoy George Brown Plaza's Splash Pads

Splash pads, one of the craziest new trends in the region, can be found right in the heart of the city, specifically at George Brown Plaza.

Think of yourself going through the city center, passing beneath the splash pads, getting wet, and cooling off from the scorching Texas heat.

It gives an entirely different experience from a peaceful and pleasant walk at the plaza.

It will quickly lift your spirits and provide you with the opportunity to get some beautiful photographs of your kids enjoying the water.

Celebrate the Scarborough Renaissance Festival With the Locals

People Dancing in Scarborough Renaissance Festival
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While rushing on horseback, knights in glistening metal armor hurl two-tone lances at one another.

"Hello, my Lord!" are the first words of touts wearing medieval garb who welcome onlookers.

Pubs are busy places where patrons may enjoy a cold beer and savory wine.

Loadmaster (David R. Tribble) This image was made by Loadmaster (David R. Tribble) Email the author: David R. Tribble Also see my personal gallery at Google Photos, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Have you somehow teleported back in time?

Nope; instead, you've found yourself in Waxahachie, Texas' Scarborough Renaissance Festival, one of the state's most cherished annual events.

Enter the fairgrounds via the castle gates, and you'll find yourself surrounded by period-style buildings housing stores offering medieval-style handcrafts, gears, and more.

People Dancing in Scarborough Renaissance Festival
Grossinger / Shutterstock.com

Attend one of the festival's unique activities, like the jousting or the demonstrations of birds of prey, and mingle with the folks dressed in period costumes while you feast and drink like a king or queen.

Beginning early April and running until late May, this is a must-see if you're in the city.

People Dancing in Scarborough Renaissance Festival
Grossinger / Shutterstock.com

Catch a Show at Chautauqua Auditorium

The Chautauqua Auditorium, located in Waxahachie's Getzendaner Memorial Park, was built in 1902 to serve as a venue for the Chautauqua Institution.

The New York-based movement originated in 1874 as a summer camp program for Sunday School teachers.

Later on, it grew into an inclusive national lecture platform for free debate of science, literature, and civics concerns.

The National Register of Historic Places now protects the ancient hall because of its unusual octagonal shape.

The facility hosts concerts and talks throughout the year, including those by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra.

Watch a Game at Stuart B. Lumpkins Stadium

Texas has a long and illustrious football history, and Waxahachie is home to the Lumpkins Stadium, a historic stadium with a rich history.

The Waxahachie Indians football team plays their home games at the stadium, which has recently undergone revamp to accommodate increased spectators.

During the games, you will be able to join in the enthusiasm of the locals for the match and take pleasure in every minute of it.

Furthermore, you will get the unique option to witness Indian soccer matches on many occasions throughout the year!

Hike Along the Waxahachie Creek

Starting at Lions Park, the Waxahachie Creek Trail travels primarily along the creek, passing by the Old Cemetery and the railroad depots in downtown Waxahachie before arriving at Railyard Park with its gigantic drums, chimes, and xylophone for you to enjoy.

At the end of the walk, you'll find Getzendaner Park, home to the historical Chautauqua Auditorium.

It was built in 1902 as an octagonal structure of architectural significance and is part of the National Register of Historic Places.

In addition to being dog friendly, the paved route is also ADA accessible.

Explore Downtown Waxahachie Through a Walking Tour

View of Downtown Waxahachie
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On the walking tour, you'll see some of the city's most significant and well-known structures.

This three-hour tour treats your eyes to the beauty of the city.

You'll get an idea of what Waxahachie has to offer, as these old buildings now serve as antique shops and galleries, as well as boutiques and eateries.

The Ellis County Museum and the city's Chamber of Commerce both have printed maps available.

A map and booklet accompany the trip, identifying 36 heritage landmarks and places and briefly discussing their significance.

The ancient Wyatt Office, constructed in 1860, is the area's oldest standing structure.

Completed in 1907 and 1908, the two train depots on the other side of the city are worlds apart.

There's one with an octagonal turret and brickwork in contrasting shades that serve as a passenger station.

On the other hand, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas depot is more conventional and has a shining red caboose in the front yard.

Visit the CNB of Texas Money Museum

In the Citizens National Bank of Texas Money Museum, but that's only the beginning, you may find currency from $5,000 to $10,000.

The items on exhibit at the bank's lobby museum are 1776 Philadelphia-printed Continental Currency, Republic of Texas bills, and 1882 Brownbacks, among the most sought-after paper currency.

The museum houses gold nuggets and checks signed by presidents and famous authors, including Robert Louis Stevenson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Charles Dickens.

The museum is available to the public during regular business hours, although it closes for lunch from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. It takes around 30 minutes to go through the entire museum. It's possible to get around the building.

Have a Good Read at Nicholas P. Sims Library

In addition to being open to both locals and visitors, the Nicholas P. Sims Library provides access to a wide range of physical and online literature.

You will get the option of spending some private time with a book in an artistic, peaceful, and cozy environment, surrounded by the lovely trees of the surrounding region, and others around you will be experiencing the same thing.

Several hours later, when you leave the library, you'll have a distinct impression that you have discovered the ideal setting in which to appreciate your book, and you will undoubtedly want to return!

Take Photos With the Spooky Munster Mansion

A Woman Standing by the Door at Munster Mansion
Yitz, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

1313 Mockinbird Lane's residents are an interesting bunch.

In Waxahachie, Texas, Munster Mansion is an homage to the 1960s comedy The Munsters, about a monster family that has become one of the most recognizable on American television.

The mansion served as the scary home from the show.

It is one of the program's most beloved features. Even the slightest elements, such as the furniture placement in every room, have been faithfully recreated.

There are also some things featured on the show, so it's like a mini-museum.

Although this is a public building, it is also a private house.

For only a  year day each year, at a charity event, tours open to the public.

Visit the Munster Mansion's website to learn more about this event.

Buy Fresh Produce From Downtown Waxahachie Farmer's Market

When it comes to getting to know a location, what's the most effective method? To do so, of course, one must sample the local cuisine.

Rich farmlands that generate a diverse array of agricultural commodities surround the city.

The Downtown Waxahachie Farmer's Market is open on Saturdays from April through October if you want to sample some of it for yourself.

Along with the vegetables, you'll discover farm-fresh eggs, a delectable assortment of baked products, and delectable jams and jellies, among other things.

If you want something to take home with you in addition to the delectable treats, you may purchase handcrafted ceramics, jewelry, and other crafts.

Whatever you're searching for, there's a good chance you'll find it at Waxahachie's farmer's market.

Admire Waxahachie's Art

Giant painted Hachie Hearts may be found throughout Waxahachie.

On the historic walking tour, you'll encounter a lot of these characters.

At Waxahachie Convention & Visitors Bureau's website, you may learn more about them, including their artists, titles, and locations.

Local artists have also done murals throughout Waxahachie.

A Calina Mishay piece and a Gonzo247 piece are both shown here.

Gonzo247's mural, which depicts Waxahachie's motto, is across the street from the Ellis County Historical Museum.

A downtown artwork by Mishay commemorates the city's distinction as Texas' crape myrtle capital.

Explore the Area's History at Ellis County Museum

Outside View of Ellis County Museum
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The museum, housed in an 1889 structure across the street from the courthouse, has exhibits spanning back to ancient times.

Still, its primary concentration is World War II artifacts and personal experiences.

Cotton plantations were present throughout Waxahachie's early years as an agricultural community. Waxahachie was first settled by railroads, then by cotton gins.

Waxahachie, Texas, cultivated 25% of the world's cotton by the 1880s. The textile industry was quick to respond.

Even though most of the cotton industry in Ellis County was destroyed by the Great Depression, finding clay in the county's soil boosted the city to become the world's largest brick-making community.

The Ellis County Museum, which houses an impressive collection of quilts, cotton in various grades (from fair to mediocre), and hand fans, is an excellent place to learn about the city's history.

The museum is free to enter, although donations are much appreciated.

Each museum tour lasts for about an hour.

Take Hachie Hearts Trail

Come on an interactive journey through "Hachie Hearts," a collection of 21 hand-painted, community-sponsored hearts created by local artists.

It's as if each heart has its personality.

Use the hashtag #HachieHeart to share your shot with the hearts on social media.

If you want to see the tour's interactive map, check out the Waxahachie Convention & Visitors Bureau website.

A public symbol of affection doesn't require a costly trip to big cities like Paris, New York, Seoul, or Moscow.

The Ellis County Museum raises money by selling heart-shaped locks for $10, keeping with the city's slogan, "Waxahachie, A Place in the Heart."

A half-block away from the museum, couples use padlocks to secure a fence.

Final Thoughts

With its year-round attractions and festivals and convenient location, Waxahachie continues to be an attractive area for visitors.

Try the ones on our list, and indeed, Waxahachie will be a "place in your heart."