See also: Best Things to Do in Hong Kong

For many people, there is rightfully no contemporary city more beauteous and thrilling as Hong Kong. Its horizon is an upended field of emboldened glass skyscrapers iced in a bow of neon lights, distinguishable against colossally lush mountain peaks. Across the  middlemost point, the Victoria Harbour crisscrosses small timber sampans, hustling  suburbanite ferries, along with super-ships as a circadian remembrance of the city’s seafaring legacy. Past achromatic islands, the South China Sea sweeps out into the distance as paying reverence to the city’s concretism. You will find everything you anticipate from a city that regularly marks itself as one of the world's most expensive places to live- breathtaking sights, stunning architecture, first-class shopping areas, a thumping nightlife, and superlative dining options.

An ultra global cosmopolitan city, Hong Kong is rightly called the ‘gateway’ to Asia. With an enviable lineation that is adorned with skyscrapers, this city is a pulsating centre of commerce and tourism. But this is not all; this city can be rightly called as one of the world’s gastronomic capitals. So profound is the city’s admiration for food that its culinary assemblage will leave you sated regardless of your gastronomic desires. When it comes to shopping, expect every need of yours catered in the budget you have in hand. With its glamorous malls, voguish boutiques, fashionable dens, and gizmo bazaars, Hong Kong has a commixture of markets that let you splurge to your heart’s content. That being said, with its maze of bustling streets and neighbourhoods, finding the most convenient place to stay could be quite of a trying task. However, in this guide, we enlist the best neighbourhoods to stay in Hong Kong.

Causeway Bay

Causeway Bay
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Chaotic and crowded, this street is considered one of the busiest streets in the whole of the world with people bustling almost round the clock. In other words, Causeway Bay is simply the heart and soul of this island. The area is replete with tasteful dining options, eateries that promise a sumptuous meal, lit bars that will prompt you to lose yourself. The consumerism is out and beaming, and every accessible space is supposedly dedicated to honouring the altar of retail. Even when visiting a moderately compact space, it would take you forever to work your way through the countless commercial centres, boutiques, and marketplaces.

If you are visiting the neighbourhood during the nighttime, make no mistake and visit Times Square, one of its prime attraction. Another peculiar area of interest includes the  Noonday Gun, an erstwhile naval cannonry gun standing at a gated site. Although historians cannot provide a solid explanation on what started this tradition, hundreds of people gather to witness the firing of this three-pounder naval gun. If you further want to try something out of the ordinary, consider visiting the fascinating realm of the city’s local villain-hitters. The sorcery is believed to combat ill fortunes and is enchanting to watch. If at all you feel claustrophobic by the sheer number of pedestrians, the Ding Ding which is the city’s ancient tram service, will offer some reprieve. Have no doubt that this neighbourhood is a genuine microcosm of Hong Kong’s purchasing percept, with up-market vogue and trend best observed in Lee Garden One, Times Square and Fashion Walk. For more mid-price and affordable goods, you can always rely on the SOGO Department Store. The helter-skelter shopping sights extend to the warren of shops that contribute a major portion of Island Beverly Centre and negotiations galore at the streets which make available an overwhelming selection of goods. For food, whether you are hungry or not, Houston Street is a remarkable place to explore. The fares available is sweeping and ranges from Italian to Thai, ensuring you leave with your palate  brimming with appetizing aftertastes.  In a nutshell, you can experience the city’s pulse amidst the neon blur, deluge of advertisements and unabashed crusade of Causeway Bay.

Central Hong Kong

Central Hong Kong
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The central is popularly hailed as the financial centre of the city. Situated in and around the vicinity of true tourist hotspots. Formerly called Chung Wang, this neighbourhood is a must-visit for everyone to take notice of how modern-day Hong Kong has evolved. There is plenty to discover here- from authentic heritage buildings to local eateries. This region encompasses sloped streets and small alleys while encapsulating the city’s rich and diverse spirit. Brimming with attraction, this neighbourhood is proudly local while being immensely global.

A matchless way to appreciate to groove on the peak experience is to entrain on a journey in the glorious Peak Tram from The Sky Terrace 428. The former, as the tallest all-round viewing platform in the city, is an arcadian and picturesque milepost that you should not neglect. There are very few better and more reposing ways to explore more of the city than on a circular cruise of Hong Kong’s celebrated Victoria Harbour. Those hankering a night of crowning blowout must emphatically visit Lan Kwai Fong, a district that is booming with bistros, pubs, restaurants and other eateries. For the shopaholic in you, a visit to the International Finance Centre Mall is highly recommended. It promises the best of the city and true to its claims, accommodates an impressive tract of attractions from shopping to cuisine and entertainment. For those on a budget, the Graham Street Market hosts an extensive array of everything you would ever require. For seeing and purchasing an across-the-board assortment of historical objects that pass over history,  the Hong Kong Maritime Museum will not disappoint you. To complete the wholesome experience of eating out, wheel out the dim sum trolleys and dine happily.

Tsim Sha Tsui

Tsim Sha Tsui
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As one of the most central neighbourhoods, it must come as no surprise that Tsim Sha Tsui is one of the most visited tourist areas in the city. Best known by the acronym TST, this region boasts breathtaking views. Not to forget the vibrant and high-spirited nightlife that extends till the wee hours of the morning. For people looking for some fun and frolic, the Avenue of Stars bears a striking semblance of Hollywood Walk of Fame. As one of the most hustling districts in Kowloon, you will practically never run out of things to do and see here. As far as the shopping scene is concerned, it is largely varied and ranges from posh designer boutiques to regional bric-a-brac ware-shops. This locality is also famed for its sizeable range of historic museums, galleries and centers of live performances. However, this region is possibly best known for its awe-inspiring views of Hong Kong’s harbour. Here, you can witness the rubble barges drift across Victoria Bay against the scenery and glistening skyline.

When visiting the neighbourhood, Kowloon Park is a place you should visit for escaping the frenetic energy of the city. Here, the surprisingly lush greenery and the sight of exotic birdwatching is sure to make your blood dance in your veins. Located next to the Victoria Harbour is the Avenue of Stars, set amidst more picturesque and breathtaking waterfront views and phenomenal skyline. The bronze statue of Bruce Lee is a celebrated spot for photographers. Decked in a humongous building, Admire K11, the world’s first art mall,   outshines any generic mall by its artistic components. It even holds exhibitions by local artists. Further along, you can see the iconic Star ferry that plays an integral role in shuttling passengers between the city and Kowloon. If you are craving some Korean delicacies, head on to Kimberly Road (more popularly called ‘Little Korea’) which is famous for restaurants and other eateries serving authentic tastes. The oldest hotel in the city, The Peninsula, is worth a visit for its much-treasured heritage of the British colonial era-the epicurean afternoon high tea.

Mong Kok

Mong Kok
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Situated at the heart of Kowloon, this area is renowned for its congested shopping and residential areas. The neon-bathed iconic streets that trail through one of the condensed parts of the world is worth paying a visit just for its sight alone.  It marks many traditional buildings and houses that are preserved commendably. That is also to say there are a great number of accommodation alternatives that are offbeat and aesthetic, making it quite an ideal place for minds with an artistic and creative curve. The shopping here is less pricey than in Causeway Bay and you can easily head on to the markets here to sass out the newest trends of practically anything at all. It is also noteworthy to know that this neighbourhood includes a cluster of street reserved for the sale of fishes, birds, and flowers. The Lady’s market here happens to be one of the city’s most sought-after markets. Just about everything can be purchased, sold and be traded over here. However shopping is not the only catch here- the dining experience is of a different level. You can savour super delectable street food being served at various local kiosks.

For the hottest styles in sneakers and shoes, the southernmost quarter of Fa Yuen Street is ideal. Here, you can purchase the hottest styles as well as stellar and limited-edition lines from leading shoemakers. For scoring whole brand-new apparel without being hard on your pockets, the Argyle Centre is a good base to start from. Another great option is Sai Yeung Choi, a dashing pedestrian street that is marked by plentiful shops, malls and restaurants from which you will be able to procure almost anything. If you are curious to know about the markets which form a vital part of Hong Kong’s singleness and identity, you are in luck! Mong Kok has several bustling markets that clinch the deal with almost anything you would ever want. You can score a bargain on designer knock offs and authentic souvenirs at affordable rates like nowhere else. Another interesting attraction that you must not miss out on, include the Wall of Fame that is actively garnished with artworks by accomplished (both international and local) graffiti artists. For relishing some delicacies, try the local street food. The intriguing selection of food is not limited to  traditional snacks alone; you can even munch on some of the famous international fares at affordable rates.

Wan Chai

Wan Chai
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The offbeat dominion of Wan Chai was formerly grubby and run-down but nowadays it is emerging out to be an engrossing neighbourhood in Hong Kong. It is largely celebrated for its prominent arts and tatty styled shabbiness. More interesting, and making it a popular option among the ex-pats are its considerably lower priced rates. Typical to the city’s style, you can witness a multitude of colonial buildings in the shadow of lofty office spaces, rendering it a cocktail of old and new. If you have a particular likeness towards history, you will find lots to keep you entertained. Along the way, do not miss out on the opportunity to grab speciality beverages and delicious cuisines.

Wan Chai is a district that competently offers much to see and do. The Wan Chai Heritage Trail is precisely what its name suggests; a walking trail that branches into two segments- architectural and cultural. Taking a stroll along this historically significant avenue could be a straightforward and costless means to explore the city’s aestheticism, and to be appreciative of its colonial and contemporary architectonics. For witnessing architecture that comes in par with that of Sydney Opera House, hop on to yet another cultural emblem of the city- the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center. Yet another equally respected institution is the Hong Kong Arts Center, a truly artistic and cultural hub that houses visual installations, photographs and occasionally, works from internationally acclaimed artists. When it comes to food and drinks, have no doubt that this neighbourhood is one of the best. It practically overflows with Dim Sum restaurants and takeaway stalls. Amongst them, the most popular options are Oddies Foodies, 22 Ships, and Tai Lung Fung.

Yau Ma Tei

Yau Ma Tei
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A more restrained but bewitching area compared to the gleaming and jazzy Tsim Sha Tsui, Yau Ma Tei is rather subdued. Although it is more on the hushed side, there are appreciable marketplaces where you can purchase traditional items. Although unfairly overlooked by a majority of tourists, this neighbourhood happens to bear the address to some of the most iconic street markets, several of the city’s oldest restaurants and an eclectic concoction of famed attractions.

While visiting the neighbourhood, we highly recommend visiting the Yau Ma Tei Theatre, which happens to be an underway venue for Cantonese Opera. This building is chronicled in history as the only remaining pre-World War II theatre in the Kowloon Peninsula. One of the many Tin Hau temples in the city is situated here- you can halt here to pay homage to the protector figure to local fishermen. Another historically valuable site happens to be the Gwo Laan, a market that sells unspoilt seasonal fruits and freshly squeezed fruit juice. The quirky nabe also marks a series of night markets that is particularly instrumental in serving local delicacies. For unwinding and relaxing, cafes such as Kubrick, Mido and Revol are a great option.